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bermanblog

Penn Station

Penn Station

Serious art has been the work of individual artists whose art has had nothing to do with style because they were not in the least connected with the style or the needs of the masses. Their work arose rather in defiance of their times. - Franz Marc

Iron Cross

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Iron Cross

Iron Cross

Title:  Iron Cross

Medium:  Oil & Colored Pencil on Canvas on Panel

Size:  20" x 16"

Copyright:  2013

Catalog #:  13.004

Here's a painting I did in 2013.  It reminds me of a quote from Winston Churchill.  Although there are a multitude of historic references to the meaning of the Iron Cross, the intent of my painting is to symbolize the Teutonic Order using my bermanesque iconography in place of the typical shield insignia.

"Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts." - Winston Churchill

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Extraterrestrial Widget

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Extraterrestrial Widget

Title:  Extraterrestrial Widget

Medium:  Oil, Alkyd & Colored Pencil on Laminated Plywood

Size:  9" x 9"

Copyright:  2007

Catalog #:  07.001

 

Throwback Thursday

Here's another painting from the past.  It was done in 2007 and featured my construction lines as well as the combination of shapes, colors and layering.  Notably, it won an Honorable Mention Award at the Sonoma Valley Museum of Art Biennial and was the first time a critic described my work and included it in his article about the show.  The critic, Colin Berry of Artweek Magazine, called it "A mysterious schematic for an extraterrestrial widget".

People frequently ask me what my paintings are about.  Frankly, I cannot really describe them better than what Mr. Berry did.  The one thing I can offer is a perspective that I was lucky enough to receive from Robert Rauschenberg when I met him at his home/studio for the book signing for Kiki's Paris in late 1989.  I asked Mr Rauschenberg how you knew you were an artist.  He told me that you are an artist if you wake up every day with the drive and desire to create your art.  In his opinion it was that simple ... so I think I'll leave it up to the art critics to come up with a proper description for my work and continue on doing what I do.

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